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Related to 'Life style risk factors'

We found no overall association of smoking or alcohol consumption with breast cancer risk, but differences in risk were observed when familial risk profiles and estrogen receptor status were taking into consideration.

Physical activity may reduce breast cancer risk by about 20% for women across the risk continuum, including those at higher-than-average risk due to their family history or genetic susceptibility.

The consistent association with educational attainment suggests low health literacy may play a role in a cancer of unknown primary diagnosis.

A large proportion of the kidney and bladder cancer burden can be attributed to behavioural factors, such as smoking, obesity, and alcohol consumption.

The results do not support increasing intakes of B vitamins or other nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism to reduce gastric cancer risk in a well-nourished population.

Excess body fatness, a trait that is of high and increasing prevalence globally, is responsible for a large proportion of the endometrial cancer burden, indicating the need for effective strategies to reduce adiposity.

What can I do to reduce cancer risk? Live a healthy and active lifestyle! Most of us know what that means, here are some specific things you can do.

What can I do to reduce cancer risk? Live a healthy and active lifestyle! Most of us know what that means, here are some specific things you can do.

Smoking remains responsible for the highest burden of lung cancer in Australia. Differences in burden identify subgroups that could benefit the most from health promotion activities.

A healthy weight and vigorous activity are essential to reduce colon cancer risk since these factors may be independent of each other.