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2018 Aboriginal Cancer Network Forum

 

The Aboriginal Cancer Network Forum aims to bring together health professionals working to support Aboriginal people affected by cancer.

It is a platform to display all the great work happening across NSW, share information and identify priorities towards reducing the burden of cancer.

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Working together: highlights from the 2018 Forum

More than 80 people attended this year’s Forum, bringing together health professionals working to support Aboriginal people affected by cancer, as well as members of the NSW Aboriginal community.

It showcased the great work happening across NSW, sharing information and identifying priorities towards reducing the burden of cancer within Aboriginal communities.

The Forum focused on the following themes:

  • Addressing barriers to access cancer services
  • Building capacity in cancer services
  • Cultural safety
  • Caring for patients and carers

Keynote speaker Dr Lisa Whop from Menzies School of Health Research, highlighted the importance of more effectively engaging the Aboriginal community with cancer screening programs.

Hunter New England’s Director of Cancer Services A/Prof Anthony Proietto promoted the district’s cancer services partnership approach.

The Forum also enabled the many unsung heroes that work tirelessly across LHDs to share information and identify priorities towards reducing the burden of cancer.

When:  Tuesday 20 and Wednesday 21 March, 2018

Where: The Terrace Room (rooftop level), L'Aqua, Dockside, Darling Harbour, Sydney NSW 2000


Forum Program
 

Tuesday 20 March

8.30am

Registration
(Tea and coffee on arrival)

9.00am

Smoking Ceremony and Welcome to Country

9.30am

Cancer Institute NSW Welcome

9.45am

Creating a positive team culture
Facilitated by Dean Widders

10.15 – 10.45am

Morning tea

10.45am

Improving the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Dr Lisa Whop, Menzies School of Health Research

11.15am

Story Telling
Facilitated by Dean Widders

11:45am

Initiatives to improve the cancer system for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
Facilitated by Dean Widders

12.45 – 1.15am

Lunch

1.15pm

Building capacity in our services
Associate Professor Anthony Proietto, Rose Wadwell and Susan Mulyk, Hunter New England LHD

1.45pm

Story Telling
Facilitated by Dean Widders

2.00pm

Café Round Table
Facilitated by Dean Widders

3.40 – 4.00pm

Afternoon Tea

4.00pm

National Bowel Screening Pilot
Jenny Brands, Menzies School of Health Research

4.15pm

Optimal Care Pathway
Barbara Daveson, Cancer Australia

4.30pm

Bush Medicine
Clarence Slockee

4.45pm

Wrap up – Day 1

5.00 – 6.00pm

Networking function
Drinks and canapes provided

Wednesday 21 March

8.30am

Registration
(Tea and coffee on arrival)

9.00am

Acknowledgement of Country

9.05am

Workshop – It’s not shame, it’s a part of life: Encouraging your patients to do a bowel screening test
Facilitated by Jenny Brands and Boden Tighe, Menzies School of Health Research

11.15 – 11.30pm

Morning tea

11:30am - 12.45am

Men’s Business Indigenous War Cry Workshop
Facilitated by Dean Widders

Women’s Business Waminda Model of Care
Facilitated by Kristine Falzon

12.30pm

Wrap up – Day 2

12.45pm

Close of Forum
Lunch provided


Workshops

It’s not shame, it’s a part of life: Encouraging your patients to do a bowel screening test 

Workshop Aim:

This workshop covers what you need to know to encourage and support your patients aged between 50 and 74 to do a bowel screening test.

The workshop includes information and practical sessions about bowel cancer and bowel screening; the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program; who should screen; and effective techniques for talking about screening with your patients. 

Indigenous War Cry Workshop

Workshop Aim:

To introduce participants to various mediums of cultural expression used by Aboriginal people including dance, music, art and symbolism.

Additionally, the workshop provides an underlying message of working as a team to achieve a common goal. 

Workshop Overview:

The Indigenous War Cry, recently led by NRL Superstar Greg Inglis during the NRL All Stars match, is a cultural expression of pride, history, and resilience for Indigenous Australians.

This workshop will enable participants to explore the symbolism used within the dance, interpret the Dreaming stories associated with the war cry and actively participate in contemporary form of Indigenous artistic expression.

Key to the success of the War Cry are underlying principles of effective communication, working coherently as a team, and striving toward a common goal. Participants can take these key principles back into their workplace and use them as a foundation for delivering an effective service to Aboriginal people.